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Special upgrade pricing has been extended to January 31, 2010.

Developers using our versions 2005 and older have come to our road shows, workshops and webinars and were convinced that RAD Studio 2010, Delphi 2010, C++Buildler 2010, and Delphi Prism 2010 are the product versions to use. Our resellers and web shops were inundated with orders at the end of last year. So that everyone can upgrade, we have extended the upgrade pricing offer until the end of January.

Here is the notice from the migration web site:

"Users of Delphi and C++Builder versions 2005 and older. Special upgrade pricing has been extended to January 31, 2010. This is your last chance to get upgrade pricing on the 2010 versions of Delphi, C++Builder, and Embarcadero RAD Studio."

The FAQ for the extended offer is at http://www.embarcadero.com/images/dm/RAD-2010-upgrade-FAQs.pdf

Pawel Glowacki, software consultant and product evangelist in our EMEA region, has put together a Delphi 2010 resource page at http://blogs.embarcadero.com/pawelglowacki/2009/12/02/38849

The RAD Studio 2010, Delphi 2010, C++Builder 2010, and Delphi Prism 2010 migration center can be found at http://www.embarcadero.com/rad-studio-2010-migration-center

Let me know what more I can do to help you move your projects forward.   Do you need more information, videos, articles, webinars, tours, >advanced workshops, beginners sessions?  Just let me know and I will help you.

Happy New Year and Happy New Decade!

David I.

davidi@embarcadero.com

{ 24 } Comments

  1. Anon | January 4, 2010 at 9:36 am | Permalink

    It still leaves a nasty taste in the mouth to read "SPECIAL Upgrade Pricing" (my emphasis on "SPECIAL").

    What is coming to an end is ANY FORM OF UPGRADE PRICING WHAT-SO-EVER, not some "SPECIAL" upgrade deal. Unless of course ALL upgrade pricing is now deemed special, and therefore something that might be withdrawn completely in the future … something which sadly I would not put past the current product mis-management team.

    Despite having been one of the most vocal supporters of Delphi over the years and roundly dismissive of the many and repeated claims that "Delphi is Dead", sadly I think this money grab and wielding of a big stick over the poorly served Delphi community in conjunction with the serious deterioration in communication and commitment to deliver on previously stated direction also marks the true beginning of the end for the product.

    So long and thanks for all the fish.

  2. David Intersimone | January 4, 2010 at 10:17 am | Permalink

    > What is coming to an end is ANY FORM OF UPGRADE PRICING WHAT-SO-EVER, not some "SPECIAL" upgrade deal. Unless of course ALL upgrade pricing is now deemed special, and therefore something that might be withdrawn completely in the future … something which sadly I would not put past the current product mis-management team.

    We’ve always had upgrade pricing. Even in the early days of Turbo Pascal. We also from time to time have special upgrade offers, product promotions and incentives. What we really want to do is help get all of our customers on the latest versions of our products.

    I also understand that some of you may be stuck in a certain version because of components, tools, "features" and such. We are here to help understand any of those migration issues and help you move forward.

    >Despite having been one of the most vocal supporters of Delphi over the years and roundly dismissive of the many and repeated claims that "Delphi is Dead", sadly I think this money grab and wielding of a big stick over the poorly served Delphi community in conjunction with the serious deterioration in communication and commitment to deliver on previously stated direction also marks the true beginning of the end for the product.

    Not sure what more to do to help you, especially since you posted anonymously. Thank you for all your support and I do hope you will continue to enjoy Delphi for years to come. We are committed to moving Delphi, C++Builder, Delphi Prism and RAD Studio forward. The roadmap is in place. Come join the field tests and the fun.

    I also believe, and you can see, the increased investment by Embarcadero Technologies in our developer tools, advertisements, PR, and marketing. Of course we have to continue to prove it every day and to deliver. You are absolutely correct that we have to stay committed to our customers.

    Thank you all for your continued support. We appreciate your business and will do everything possible to continue to deserve your business.

    David I.

  3. FromEurope | January 4, 2010 at 11:30 am | Permalink

    I am afraid David I would have to disagree with the statement ‘roadmaps in place’. Mainly because they are generally far too vague compared with other vendors I deal with . Often major parts of them are also just scrapped or suddenly moved back to indeterminate points in future with no idea of even which year they might appear ! The prime example been the Win64 compilation and VCL a saga which has gone on for several years !

    After the latest sudden Roadmap change putting back Win64 compilation yet again I said enough is enough and Stopped SA .
    I am currently at Delphi 2009 and will stop there until a Fully Validated Working Win64 compiler And VCL are available.

    I fully understand the frustrations of Anon poster above.

  4. David Intersimone | January 4, 2010 at 12:41 pm | Permalink

    > I am currently at Delphi 2009 and will stop there until a Fully Validated Working Win64 compiler And VCL are available.

    You are right about roadmap changes - that is why we always put warnings in our roadmaps that things may be subject to changes, especially during the previous company we were a part of.

    We will consistently have to prove that we deserve your business. I can’t undo things that happened in the past, but we can work together for the future, especially now that we are part of Embarcadero Technologies.

    Send me an email and we’ll keep you listed so that when we have early preview technologies, we can invite you to take part in the fun.

  5. Peter | January 4, 2010 at 2:30 pm | Permalink

    David,
    the Delphi road map is worth nothing. It has been changed/stalled/dropped so often in last years. We want a Delphi 64 bit. Now. Please would you put your reputation on the table. Thanks!

    -
    TP/Delphi user since 1987.

  6. Mason Wheeler | January 4, 2010 at 3:39 pm | Permalink

    Anon: It’s not "ANY FORM OF UPGRADE PRICING WHAT-SO-EVER" that’s coming to an end. It’s the ability to upgrade from very old versions of Delphi. Upgrade pricing will still be available, but only to people who have actually bought Delphi in recent memory.

  7. Fritz | January 4, 2010 at 10:53 pm | Permalink

    David,
    I’m a "on Board" since TP3.0 1987. Now using D2010.
    i have to leave Delphi because the not existing Win64 compiler. I’m in the situation that im writing tools around a CAD-Sytem. They will release a 64 Version in 2011. The work has startet now. But with not realy a Timeframe for a Delphi 64 Bit compiler i have to go the C++ way now. Its a nightmare for me. But i can not longer trust

  8. Peter | January 5, 2010 at 1:48 am | Permalink

    I can understand that you want to stop allowing upgrades from very old versions.
    What annoys me is that I early last summer took you up on such an offer ‘last chance to update from D2006′, or rather convinced my employeer to give me an update even though I don’t really use it in work for the time being.

    At the time I knew that D2010 was about to be released after summer but got the update anyway since it was the last chance to get it from my D2006 version.

    Guess how I felt when 2010 was released with the option to update from earlier versions still there.

  9. Anon | January 5, 2010 at 8:59 am | Permalink

    The current "Roadmap" is not recognisable as any such thing.

    Firstly it references things that have already happened (it’s a rear view mirror!) and secondly the things that are forward looking have no real sense of context, priority or timetable - it’s a destination, not a plan of how we’re going to get there.

    Previous "RoadMaps" have proven utterly worthless. Where indications of timetable have been given they have slipped and then been dropped entirely. That situation has gotten WORSE now that you have slipped the reins of Borland, NOT BETTER! This is probably because despite the disclaimers that are of course a part of any roadmap - or any foward looking statement (the future is not certain, after all) - you presumably had to be more careful with what you put into a roadmap.

    These days you can just throw out a rag tag bunch of poorly crafted PowerPoint slides that the latest batch of great, sexy, cool looking/sounding ideas happened to have stuck to, and call it a "RoadMap" without feeling that you have to answer to ANYONE, never mind shareholders or the community.

    If this is genuinely your idea of good custodianship and providing "direction" for the product, then my fears for the future of Delphi under the stewardship of Embarcadero (and the CodeGear mismanagement team that came to Embarcadero from Borland) are woefully short of the painful truth.

    It was tempting to believe the notion that it was Borland that were responsible for the mismanagement of Delphi in the past.

    That seemed to be the case when CodeGear were given some autonomy and things took a distinct turn for the better. Turbo Editions, the refocussing on native code… all were good signs and portents.

    But I wonder now if in fact those were the result of directives from *BORLAND* to improve the attractiveness of the CodeGear unit in preparation for it’s sale. Because now that "CodeGear" (another good idea that has been quietly and unceremoniously *binned*) has complete autonomy under Embarcadero, what we have seen is a return to the bungled management, poor direction, woefully inadequate communication and utterly bemusing technology choices of the past.

  10. David I. | January 5, 2010 at 9:11 am | Permalink

    >Upgrade to Delphi 2010 and get Delphi 2007 included for FREE!

    Upgrade to All Access and get all recent versions of Delphi

  11. Anon | January 5, 2010 at 9:11 am | Permalink

    @Mason: When you say "in recent memory", what you actually mean is, before Borland/CodeGear started delivering products that people had no need for or wouldn’t dare risk upgrading to because the quality was so poor.

    The problem for Embarcadero now is that the more recent versions though better in quality and arguably more relevant have introduced even greater hurdles for people wishing to upgrade from those older versions (or indeed even from more recent ones).

    This policy is designed to do one thing and one thing only: FORCE upgrades from people disenfranchised during that period and for whom spending on current versions would otherwise be a waste of money since they cannot USE those versions due to the Unicode gap and the poorly conceived implementation (from the point of view of enabling users of older versions to easily, safely and CONFIDENTLY migrate).

    In other words: We failed to provide a product that you WANT to upgrade to, so by way of apology… UPGRADE NOW OR ELSE.

    People used to complain that Borland treated Delphi like a cash cow. But even in the dark days of Inprise, Borland never stooped THIS low to milk that cow.

  12. Anon | January 5, 2010 at 9:12 am | Permalink

    @Mason and David I:

    The correct way to encourage upgrades from those users of older versions would have been this:

    Upgrade to Delphi 2010 and get Delphi 2007 included for FREE!

  13. David Intersimone | January 5, 2010 at 12:24 pm | Permalink

    > Anyway I usually think that when a "special offer" is extended, it’s because *it didn’t reach expected results*, not because of great success.

    Actually two things: 1) the special offer was a great success. 2) we extended the offer because some customers needed the extra time to work with their purchasing/procurement departments (at some larger corporations and also government agencies) and there were some customers who had problems getting approvals during the holiday period.

    In any case, for everyone who hasn’t upgraded and wants to, this is extra time to take advantage of the offer and get on the 2010 version/editions of RAD Studio, Delphi, and C++Builder. For those who took advantage of the offer, thank you.

    For those who are still not sure whether to move forward with us - let me know what more I can do to help you get to version 2010. If it is some additional information, just let me know. If it is a special live meeting session to show you some capabilities or migration strategies, just let me know. I am at your service. Again, thank you for being a part of our community and your support for Embarcadero Technologies.

  14. David Intersimone | January 5, 2010 at 12:28 pm | Permalink

    > the Delphi road map is worth nothing. It has been changed/stalled/dropped so often in last years. We want a Delphi 64 bit. Now. Please would you put your reputation on the table.

    The roadmap will be updated over time (as it has been updated in that past). The roadmap has never been dropped, although I will admit that we have taken out of date roadmaps down and re-posted them as they have been updated and approved.

    All companies (consumer, hardware, software, electronics, scientific, automative, etc) that publish roadmaps do their best efforts to deliver what they promise, but sometimes things change, directions change, companies change. I was told that there would be a plug-in hybrid Toyota Prius read this year, then it was slipped to at least next year. I was told there would a Windows 94 and then it slipped to 1995.

    Regarding the 64-bit compiler, Nick Hodges clearly articulated the status of the "new compiler" in an EDN article. Work continues on the new compiler and when we have something more concrete to tell everyone, we will do it. 64-bit Windows is still on the roadmap, absolutely for sure.

  15. LDS | January 5, 2010 at 12:34 pm | Permalink

    I am sure everybody still on D2005 are convinced that *any* other version you give him, even Delphi 1, is the version to use. Anyway I usually think that when a "special offer" is extended, it’s because *it didn’t reach expected results*, not because of great success.

  16. Anon | January 5, 2010 at 3:10 pm | Permalink

    "Upgrade to All Access"

    And in those 4 words you confirm that we are indeed in a new"Era of Inprise" and the last dismal days of Delphi.

    All Access is a non-starter for "the little guys". People who’s work entails working with Delphi may convince their employers of the sense of All Access, but when they come to purchase their own license for use at home/independent projects/hobby, All Access is patently not the right product for them simply based on the COST alone.

    The license may allow them to use the product outside of work (but this is by no means certain I think), but often the terms of employment contract make this undesirable (the employer asserting ownership of IP produced using software licenses owned by them even if used on an individual’s time).

    And even for an employer, if they are only a native-code Delphi ISV with no particular interest in the very wide range of other Embarcadero products, All Access still is by no means a "slam dunk" proposition.

    Where All Access makes perfect sense is in the large ENTERPRISE, departmental scale development outfits.

    The Delphi community has been vocal in criticising the mistake Borland made in pursuing that market at the EXPENSE of neglecting the "little guy", who historically have always underpinned the Delphi market.

    Embarcadero it seems are intent on ignoring that mistake, and indeed repeating it. But that frankly comes as no great surprise.

    The disregard for the concerns of the community w.r.t the Unicode implementation, resulting in the predictable (indeed, predictED), understandable and entirely justified reluctance of many to upgrade and tackle the job of bridging the "Unicode Gap"…

    (and the wielding of The Big Stick to try to force them to upgrade where product direction has failed)

    The bewildering change in priority and the decision to focus on cross-platform before 64-bit, despite a vocal expression of dismay, frustration and disappointment from the current customer base…

    The lack of any sort of development or even any indication that there is intended ever to BE any development in the area of a re-revival of the"Turbo" line, despite the clear support for such a thing and the obvious benefits it would bring… (despite having given an initial indication that this was the intention)…

    All of the optimism and expectation during the early days of Embarcadero’s tenure has sadly been squandered and extinguished.

  17. The Dad | January 6, 2010 at 8:22 am | Permalink

    The last thing that Delphi needs is to alienate more users. Whenever the cutoff is set the remaining group of old users will be gone for good. Best thing to do to keep hope alive 1) extend uppgrade period at least 1 year, (2) reduce pricing on all products and upgrades 25-35%.

    Current pricing is a bit out of range for a number of small shops that I know of. Otherwise, they would jump back onboard.

  18. Joe White | January 6, 2010 at 6:35 pm | Permalink

    > let me know what more I can do to help you get to version 2010

    I already have: http://blog.excastle.com/2009/09/24/kinda-wishing-i-could-keep-using-delphi/

    Make Delphi affordable for the hobbyist. I’ve been programming professionally in Delphi for… I guess something like twelve years now. But as far as I know, our department was the last Delphi shop within a few hundred miles, and we cut everything over to C# last month. Which means I’m now a Delphi hobbyist, if I’m Delphi anything at all.

    Even with the "special" upgrade pricing, I simply can’t justify spending $400 on a hobby. Maybe some people can, and I wish you luck squeezing more money out of them. But like I said back in September: at $400, I walk away. With regret.

  19. Rodrigo | January 7, 2010 at 7:39 am | Permalink

    A few years ago you put out free versions with the Turbo editions, suddenly Delphi was in the scene again, but you stop cold and never offered free version on the following releases. In order to keep the product alive and competitive you need to do it again and keep it on every release. Hobbyist, small shops, newcomers will embrace it and will help spreading Delphi around and bring it back, if is not too late.
    Go Delphi.

  20. Rodrigo | January 7, 2010 at 7:41 am | Permalink

    A few years ago you put out free versions with the Turbo editions, suddenly Delphi was in the scene again, but you stopped cold and never offered free version on the following releases. In order to keep the product alive and competitive you need to do it again and keep it on every release. Hobbyist, small shops, newcomers will embrace it and will help spreading Delphi around and bring it back, if is not too late.

    Go Delphi.

  21. Rodrigo | January 7, 2010 at 7:46 am | Permalink

    A few years ago you put out free versions with the Turbo editions, suddenly Delphi was in the scene again, but you stopped cold and never offered free version on the following releases. In order to keep the product alive and competitive you need to do it again and keep it on every release. Hobbyist, small shops, newcomers will embrace it and will help spreading Delphi around and bring it back, if is not too late.

    -Go Delphi.

  22. David Intersimone | January 7, 2010 at 8:04 am | Permalink

    > Make Delphi affordable for the hobbyist.

    Michael Rozlog, Sr Director for RAD Products, is working on a business proposal that defines several sub-Professional Edition products. We definitely want to get more students, hobbyists, casual/occupational developers using Delphi. We also are continuing to define future versions of Delphi, C++Builder and Delphi Prism for professionals, enterprise and architect level developers.

    Michael tells me that he is working on an update to the public roadmap as I type this reply - no date yet for the roadmap update, so stay tuned to EDN.

    Thanks, everyone, for your comments, suggestions, concerns and encouragements. This is what makes a development community stay alive and thrive.

  23. David Intersimone | January 7, 2010 at 9:23 am | Permalink

    > A few years ago you put out free versions with the Turbo editions, suddenly Delphi was in the scene again, but you stopped cold and never offered free version on the following releases. In order to keep the product alive and competitive you need to do it again and keep it on every release.

    I don’t disagree with the need to reach out to new developers, students, hobbyists and others. I might disagree about the need for free products to accomplish this but I don’t deny that we need ways to provide affordable products for different categories of developers.

    In order to keep the product alive and competitive we need to continue our drive towards perfect quality and documentation, add new capabilities, support additional platforms (in this I include new versions of Windows, 64-bit Windows, Linux, Macintosh, iPhone, Android, …) and reach out to attract new customers. All of this takes investment, people, marketing and more.

  24. Rodrigo | January 8, 2010 at 8:01 am | Permalink

    I used the word competitive for a lack of a better one, but what a was trying to say is that right now people with the desire of start of learning a programming language or professionals with a limited income can go to the Microsoft website and download versions of C# or Visual Basic for fro free. Delphi is already competitive as is and even better and many areas, but many of us won’t spend even $100 if there are something else out there that we can get for free. I will suggest a strip down version of Delphi made for the masses for free and offer the extra features in separate packages like plug-ins, for a reasonable fee, but still keep the regular professional and enterprise editions for those who can afford them. These are just my humble suggestions.

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